bosswin168 slot gacor 2023
situs slot online
slot online
situs judi online
boswin168 slot online
agen slot bosswin168
bosswin168
slot bosswin168
mabar69
mabar69 slot online
mabar69 slot online
bosswin168
ronin86
ronin86
ronin86
ronin86
ronin86
ronin86
ronin86
ronin86
cocol77
ronin86
cocol77
cocol77
https://wowcamera.info/
mabar69
mahjong69
mahjong69
mahjong69
mabar69
master38
master38
master38
cocol88
bosswin168
mabar69
MASTER38 MASTER38 MASTER38 MASTER38 BOSSWIN168 BOSSWIN168 BOSSWIN168 BOSSWIN168 BOSSWIN168 COCOL88 COCOL88 COCOL88 COCOL88 MABAR69 MABAR69 MABAR69 MABAR69 MABAR69 MABAR69 MABAR69 MAHJONG69 MAHJONG69 MAHJONG69 MAHJONG69 RONIN86 RONIN86 RONIN86 RONIN86 RONIN86 RONIN86 RONIN86 RONIN86 ZONA69 ZONA69 ZONA69 NOBAR69 ROYAL38 ROYAL38 ROYAL38 ROYAL38 ROYAL38 ROYAL38 ROYAL38 ROYAL38
SLOT GACOR HARI INI SLOT GACOR HARI INI
BOSSWIN168 BOSSWIN168
BARON69
COCOL88
MAX69 MAX69 MAX69
COCOL88 COCOL88 LOGIN BARON69 RONIN86 DINASTI168 RONIN86 RONIN86 RONIN86 RONIN86 MABAR69 COCOL88
ronin86
bwtoto
bwtoto
bwtoto
master38
Surging COVID cases trigger warning to vaccinate

A new wave of COVID cases is hitting the nation, as experts warn people to remain vigilant and stay up to date with their vaccines as we enter the festive season.

Associate Professor James Trauer, head of the epidemiological modelling unit at Monash University, says there is a surge of COVID infections spreading through the community.

“Vaccination remains our most important defence against COVID, even though the virus shouldn’t ruin Christmas this year,” he said on Wednesday.

Watch the latest news and stream for free on 7plus >>

COVID is now an endemic virus, which means it cannot be eliminated and is continuously transmitted.

Surges in coronavirus cases were generally caused by new variants, which meant it was “more difficult than ever to predict” when these waves would peak, Prof Trauer said.

Scientists’ view of community transmission is further muddied by a lack of data.

Aussie nurse shares the life-saving ‘mum’s kiss’ method every parent should know

Emily has had 20 jobs in two years. Doctors say the reason why is all in her head

With a marked decline in testing, the daily number of cases does not paint a clear picture of the spread of the virus, though researchers can still use hospital admission numbers and wastewater surveillance to monitor COVID waves.

The severity of coronavirus cases has decreased and fewer Australians are being admitted to ICU because of high levels of population immunity garnered through vaccinations and natural protection from past infections.

Health Minister Mark Butler says it is a new phase of the pandemic.

“We’re seeing pretty regular waves every four or six months,” he told ABC Perth.

“Each wave is a little bit smaller than the one before it.

“We’re getting better every single time at how we manage it in hospital systems and in aged care facilities.”

But he emphasised that the virus “hasn’t gone away”.

Australians are being warned to get vaccinated as cases of COVID-19 take off around the country. (Diego Fedele/AAP PHOTOS) Credit: AAP

Prof Trauer says Australians should still exercise caution by wearing a mask and testing before interacting with vulnerable people, such as those older than 65 and especially people over 75.

They should also seek booster vaccines as they provide longer-term immunity than reinfection.

“Booster doses are not recommended at this time for children and adolescents under 18 years of age who do not have any risk factors for severe COVID,” according to the Department of Health.

Prof Trauer said: “Our most important protection against the effects of COVID is immunity, which can be enhanced through vaccination.”

Butler said he was concerned about the comparatively low booster shot uptake, with authorities saying only one quarter of vulnerable Australians have had a recent jab.

“The booster rate is not what we saw in the first few years of the pandemic,” he said.

“I’m particularly concerned that older Australians get out there and get their booster.”

New boosters

New COVID vaccines, which target common variants of the virus, will be made available from next month.

Pfizer’s monovalent XBB.1.5 vaccine will be available for use in eligible Australians aged five and older.

The Moderna monovalent XBB.1.5 vaccine can be used for those 12 and older.

“They’re the cutting edge most up-to-date vaccines, but thankfully the vaccines that are currently in pharmacies and in general practice are … also very, very effective at protecting you from severe disease or death,” Butler said.

Those who have had a vaccination this year don’t need to get jabbed again.

Little boy’s birthmark-like spots turn out to be sign of ‘ticking timebomb’

Boy’s agonising wait for transplant to treat condition that killed brother

If you’d like to view this content, please adjust your Cookie Settings.

To find out more about how we use cookies, please see our Cookie Guide.

COCOL88 GACOR77 RECEH88 NGASO77 TANGO77 PASUKAN88 MEWAHBET MANTUL138 EPICWIN138 WORTEL21 WORTEL21 WORTEL21 WORTEL21 WORTEL21